An analysis of the native american speech of red jacket

He often wore a British army officer's coat, hence the name Red Jacket. This speech came about in as a response to Jacob Cram, a New England missionary.

An analysis of the native american speech of red jacket

This speech came about in as a response to Jacob Cram, a New England missionary. On this day, the two differing sides met in Buffalo Creek, New York, to further discuss their religious beliefs.

After meeting with the leaders of the Seneca delegation, Red Jacket provided a thought-out response representing his people as a whole. Red Jacket, also known as Sagoyewatha, was a chief and orator born in eastern New York; he derived his English name from his habit of wearing many red coats provided to him by his British allies.

After the hostilities, as the British ceded their territories to the Americans, the Senecas and many other Indian peoples faced enormous pressure on their homelands. Red Jacket was a critical mediator in relations between the new U.

He orders all things, and he has given us a fine day for our council. He has taken his garment from before the sun, and caused it to shine with brightness upon us; our eyes are opened, that we see clearly; our ears are unstopped, that we have been able to hear distinctly the words that you have spoken; for all these favors we thank the Great Spirit and him only.

Brother, this council fire was kindled by you; it was at your request that we came together at this time; we have listened with attention to what you have said. You requested us to speak our minds freely; this gives us great joy, for we now consider that we stand upright before you, and can speak what we think; all have heard your voice, and all speak to you as one man; our minds are agreed.

Brother, you say you want an answer to your talk before you leave this place. It is right you should have one, as you are a great distance from home, and we do not wish to detain you; but we will first look back a little, and tell you what our fathers have told us, and what we have heard from the white people.

Brother, listen to what we say. There was a time when our forefathers owned this great island. Their seats extended from the rising to the setting sun. The Great Spirit had made it for the use of Indians. He had created the buffalo, the deer, and other animals for food.

He made the bear and the beaver, and their skins served us for clothing. He had scattered them over the country, and taught us how to take them. He had caused the earth to produce corn for bread. All this he had done for his red children because he loved them.

If we had any disputes about hunting grounds, they were generally settled without the shedding of much blood. But an evil day came upon us; your forefathers crossed the great waters, and landed on this island.

Their numbers were small; they found friends, and not enemies; they told us they had fled from their own country for fear of wicked men, and come here to enjoy their religion. They asked for a small seat; we took pity on them, granted their request, and they sat down amongst us; we gave them corn and meat; they gave us poison in return.

The white people had now found our country; tidings were carried back, and more came amongst us; yet we did not fear them, we took them to be friends; they called us brothers; we believed them, and gave them a larger seat.

At length, their numbers had greatly increased; they wanted more land; they wanted our country. Our eyes were opened, and our minds became uneasy. Wars took place; Indians were hired to fight against Indians, and many of our people were destroyed. They also brought strong liquor among us; it was strong and powerful, and has slain thousands.

Brother, our seats were once large, and yours were very small; you have now become a great people, and we have scarcely a place left to spread our blankets; you have got our country, but are not satisfied; you want to force your religion upon us.

Brother, continue to listen. You say you are sent to instruct us how to worship the Great Spirit agreeably to his mind, and if we do not take hold of the religion which you white people teach, we shall be unhappy hereafter.

An analysis of the native american speech of red jacket

You say that you are right, and we are lost; how do we know this to be true? We understand that your religion is written in a book; if it was intended for us as well as you, why has not the Great Spirit given it to us, and not only to us, but why did he not give to our forefathers the knowledge of that book, with the means of understanding it rightly?Sep 18,  · An Analysis of Red Jacket's Speech to the Senate but Red Jacket probably meant it to mean that North America was the Native American’s homeland, and the white people’s homeland is over the sea, and that they should go back.

Red Jacket talks about how the Native Americans cared for the white people when they first came to. Native American History Summary & Analysis. BACK; NEXT ; This characterization of Native Americans was typified in the canonization of Chief Seattle, and his speech became a manifesto for many environmentalists.

not the authentic plea of a 19th-century Native American. Red Jacket's speech on "Religion for the White Man and the Red" () has been preserved as an example of his great oratorical style.

Life. Red Jacket's birthplace has long been a matter of debate. In he led a delegation of 50 Native American leaders to Philadelphia.

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Mar 07,  · First of all, excellent job in analyzing Red Jacket’s speech to members of the Boston Missionary Society and to his own people.

Forgive me if I’m wrong though, I don’t think he prohibited the missionaries from proselytizing among his people. Red Jacket's speech on "Religion for the White Man and the Red" () has been preserved as an example of his great oratorical style.

Life. Red Jacket's birthplace has long been a matter of debate. In he led a delegation of 50 Native American leaders to Philadelphia. Sep 18,  · An Analysis of Red Jacket's Speech to the Senate but Red Jacket probably meant it to mean that North America was the Native American’s homeland, and the white people’s homeland is over the sea, and that they should go back.

Red Jacket talks about how the Native Americans cared for the white people when they first came to.

Red Jacket Defends Native American Religion,