Book report activities for third grade

Use these twenty-five ideas to shake up your book-related activities. Grades PreK—K, 1—2, 3—5, 6—8 If you notice big eye rolls or hear lots of groaning when you mention the words "book reports," it's probably time to shake up your repertoire of book-related activities. The following ideas will rev up your students' enthusiasm for reading while creating opportunities for them to practice reading comprehension strategies and build language arts skills. Most of the activities are adaptable across grade levels and are flexible enough for whole-group, small group, or individual assignments.

Book report activities for third grade

Do your students grumble every time you mention the words book reports? Education World presents 25 ideas for you to use or adapt. Ideas for cyber book reports! Are you a teacher who keeps saying "I wish I could find a way to make book reports more fun and interesting for my students"?

Education World offers 25 ideas that might help you do just that! Make A Book Report Sandwich! In a recent posting to the Teachers. The teacher commissioned a friend to draw slices of ham, tomato, and Swiss cheese; lettuce leaves; a layer of mayonnaise, and a couple of slices of bread.

Book report activities for third grade

Then she photocopied the drawings onto appropriately colored sheets of paper -- ham on pink, tomato on red, Swiss cheese on yellow, etc.

The sheets served as the ingredients for her students' book report sandwiches. On the top slice of bread, each student wrote the title and the author of the book the student had just finished reading. On the lettuce, the student wrote a brief summary of the book.

The student wrote about the main character on the tomato slice. On the mayonnaise, the student described the book's setting. The student shared the book's climax on the Swiss cheese. On the ham slice, the student described the plot. On the bottom piece of bread, the student drew a favorite scene from the story.

Students stapled together their sandwich layers, then slapped their concoctions up on a bulletin board headlined "We're Hungry for Good Books!

Even better, the bulletin board served as a menu for students who were ravenous for a good read. All they had to do was grab a sandwich to learn whether a particular book might satisfy their appetites! One day, while exploring postings to the MiddleWeb ListservHayden found an idea that filled the bill!

Hayden challenged her students to be creative with the "Book in a After choosing and reading a book, each student selected a book report container. The container could be a plastic bag, a manila envelope, a can, or anything else that might be appropriate for a book.

Students decorated their containers to convey some of the major details, elements, or themes found in the books. When the containers were complete, students went to work on the contents of their containers.

They were instructed to include the following: Questions Write ten questions based on the book. Five of the questions can be about general content, but the other five must require more thinking.

Vocabulary Create a ten-word glossary of unfamiliar words from the book. Things Include five things that have a connection to the story. The third and final part of the project was the student presentation.

Create a List

Each student presented a "Book in a" project to the class. In the presentation, the student explained the connection of the container to the story, conducted a show and tell about the five things, and then shared information about three of the book's literary elements -- setting, characters, conflicts, climax, or resolution.

If you've been working on other literary elements with your students -- foreshadowing, personification, or flashbacks, for example -- you might give extra credit to students for pointing out those elements in their books. Why not challenge your students' creativity? Adapt Hayden's idea to fit your students' needs and skills.

Book Reports 3rd Grade. Showing top 8 worksheets in the category - Book Reports 3rd Grade. Some of the worksheets displayed are 3rd grade book report, Reading university 2nd 3rd grade book report, Writing a formal book report, My book report, Book report fiction, 2nd grade book report, 5 grade summer reading book report, 15 ready to use work to use with almost any. 3RD GRADE BOOK REPORT Name _____ A. Introduction 1. Title _____ 2. Author _____ 3. Type of book _____ B. Body 1. When and where the story takes place is the main idea that the author has tried to say through the events in this book? (What is the moral of this book.). Tired of the same old book report formats? Spice up those old book reports with some new ideas. Home >> Lesson Plans >> Fresh Ideas for Creative Book Reports. Search form. Search. The third and final part of the project was the student presentation. Each .

The ideas appeal to many different learning styles. Many of the ideas involve making choices, organizing information -- and writing! Most of the ideas will provide teachers with a clear idea about whether students actually read the book.

And all the ideas will engage students, help make books come alive for them, and challenge them to think in different ways about the books they read!2nd Grade Reading 2nd Grade Books First Grade Third Grade Grade 3 Book Report Projects Reading Projects Reading Activities Book Projects Forward Use this EDITABLE Book Report flipbook organizer to scaffold the structure of a Book Report.

Book Reports 3rd Grade. Showing top 8 worksheets in the category - Book Reports 3rd Grade. Some of the worksheets displayed are 3rd grade book report, Reading university 2nd 3rd grade book report, Writing a formal book report, My book report, Book report fiction, 2nd grade book report, 5 grade summer reading book report, 15 ready to use work to use with almost any.

Illustration Book Report Create an illustration to represent each story element (setting, characters, beginning, middle, and end). Create an illustration for the title of the book as well.

3RD GRADE BOOK REPORT Name _____ A. Introduction 1. Title _____ 2. Author _____ 3. Type of book _____ B. Body 1.

When and where the story takes place is the main idea that the author has tried to say through the events in this book?

Classroom Activities: 25 Book Report Alternatives | Scholastic

(What is the moral of this book.). Classroom Activities: 25 Book Report Alternatives. or hear lots of groaning when you mention the words "book reports," it's probably time to shake up your repertoire of book-related activities. Most of the activities are adaptable across grade levels and are flexible enough for whole-group, small group, or individual assignments.

“I have been told by the third grade teacher that my daughter Poppet is reading at middle school level. Yet if I leave Poppet a note in block letters telling her to feed the dogs I will come home to find the dogs have been given a swim in the above-ground pool, dressed in tutus, provided with hair weaves.

Book Report / FREE Printable Worksheets – Worksheetfun